Transitioning From VB Script to Powershell

VB Script is still around and will be for quite a while yet.  But current Windows technology is all about Powershell.  As well it should be, as PS is vastly superior in many, many ways.

However, a lot of us still have old VB scripts hanging around, probably doing production work... and what I’m about to show you may be the trickiest part of porting those old scripts over into Powershell. 

As you probably know, Powershell fully harnesses the power and flexibility of .NET, while VB Script was only capable of working with COM objects.  Almost everything that can be done with COM objects can be done faster and easier with .NET.  (For the foreseeable future at least - I hear COM is making a bit of a comeback in Windows 8...)  However, Powershell is still fully capable of working with COM objects too.  What that means is that those of you who are still more comfortable with VB script or have a lot of script to port over in a hurry, well, you don’t have to worry about finding .NET equivalents for those COM objects. (Even if there might be a better, more Powershell-native way of doing it.) 

Let’s take Microsoft Cluster Services for example.  Here’s what you would see in a VB script that deals with cluster resources: 


Set oCluster = CreateObject("MSCluster.Cluster")


 In Powershell it’d be something like this: 


$cluster = New-Object –COMObject MSCluster.Cluster


 Now  you have your cluster object.  Want to see what all members it has?  (The properties of it + its methods/what all it can do?) 


$cluster | Get-Member


 Alright well I see that $cluster is basically an object collection that has, among other things, a ResourceGroups object in it, so let’s open that up: 


$ResourceGroups = $cluster.ResourceGroups


 And then do a $ResourceGroups | Get-Member to see what we can do with that: 


PS C:\Users\ryan> $resourceGroups | Get-Member

   TypeName: System.__ComObject#{f2e60706-2631-11d1-89f1-00a0c90d061e}

Name                MemberType Definition
----                ---------- ----------
Delete              Method     void Delete ()
Move                Method     Variant Move (Variant, Variant)
Offline             Method     Variant Offline (Variant)
Online              Method     Variant Online (Variant, Variant)
Cluster             Property   ISCluster Cluster () {get}
CommonProperties    Property   ISClusProperties CommonProperties () {get}
CommonROProperties  Property   ISClusProperties CommonROProperties () {get}
Handle              Property   ULONG_PTR Handle () {get}
Name                Property   string Name () {get} {set}
OwnerNode           Property   ISClusNode OwnerNode () {get}
PreferredOwnerNodes Property   ISClusResGroupPreferredOwnerNodes PreferredOwnerNodes () {get}
PrivateProperties   Property   ISClusProperties PrivateProperties () {get}
PrivateROProperties Property   ISClusProperties PrivateROProperties () {get}
Resources           Property   ISClusResGroupResources Resources () {get}
State               Property   CLUSTER_GROUP_STATE State () {get}

So hopefully this is starting to pique your interest.  With this sort of information you could easily script out whether all the cluster resource groups were on the correct nodes, and even move them if need be.  Pretty neat stuff.

I leave you with this - don't you hate it when this happens?

F'ed up log

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